Author Archives: RomanInUkraine

Vasiliy Lomachenko overwhelms José Pedraza late to unify lightweight titles

On a night when Vasiliy Lomachenko did not appear at his imperious best, the sport’s most technically proficient fighter was more than brilliant enough to come through with a sensational finishing kick to unify lightweight titles and bolster an already persuasive claim for the No 1 spot in boxing’s pound-for-pound pecking order.

Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2018/dec/09/vasiliy-lomachenko-jose-pedraza-fight-lightweight-titles

Of course, if there’s a dissenting political movement in the West, there are Russian agents

Russian Donetsk agents propaganda photo during yellow vest protests

kind of like this:

In the famous “Deception was my job” interviews of ex-KGB agent Yuri Bezmenov (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y3qkf3bajd4) he talks about he was even tasks to infiltrate the Transcendental Mediation movement in California because Moscow thought it might be useful to have influence for it.

Russia fires on and seizes Ukraine ships which tried to access Azov Sea

Here is what happened today:

(BBC summary here: https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-46338671)

The Ukrainian navy tried to do a freedom-of-navigation operation and transit through the Kerch straits.

The Ukrainian flotilla consisted of two of the new Gurza-class gunboats, and one tug.

First, a FSB craft rammed the Ukrainian tug, causing damage. You can see a video of the ramming here. I am not a seaman, but it seems to me like a pretty clear-cut ram, with the Ukrainian tug stopping (perhaps to avoid the other FSP ship in front of him) and the much-larger Russian ship evidently turning to ram the vessel head on.

You can hear the Russian commander shouting “hit him on the right! Hit him on the right!” along with copious cursing.

Then, and the precise events are not clear yet – Russian ships opened fire on the Ukrainian warships and reportedly boarded and captured the warships. There are reports this happened in an area of the sea of Azov that even Russia calls “international waters.” Six Ukrainian sailors are said to have been injured, two seriously. The crew’s status is unclear.

This is a clear act of war.

Russia has also moved a ship into the channel under the Kerch bridge, blocking any further traffic. This is a de-facto blockade of Ukraine’s eastern coast, another act of war.

This is a serious escalation. Russia just engaged in naval warfare, capturing Ukrainian sailors.

https://defence-blog.com/news/russia-captured-ukrainian-naval-vessels.html

The Nazino Affair: The Tragedy of Cannibal Island

On March 11, 1933, a plan for a very different kind of gulag was presented to Joseph Stalin. Devised by Genrikh Yagoda, Stalin’s head of the Secret Service and Matvei Berman, the head of the Soviet Gulag system, the scheme proposed that the government resettle 2,000,000 political undesirables in self-sufficient settlements in Siberia and Kazakhstan. The idea was that the “settlers” would work to bring a million hectares of untouched land into agricultural production, thus helping famine struck Russia- and sustaining themselves. So, in May 1933 the first assortment of 6,000 political dissidents and petty criminals were loaded up into trains. Their destination was the isolated Western Siberian Island of Nazino.

The Nazino colony was meant to achieve self-sufficiency in two years. However, thirteen weeks after its conception, the project had failed spectacularly. For the settlers were abandoned in a hostile Siberian wilderness, under-resourced and unprepared. All too soon, anarchy, violence, and disease became rife in the community. When the authorities finally intervened, after the rejection of the plan by Stalin, they discovered that 4,000 of the original deportees were either dead or missing. Most disturbingly of all, however, was the number of survivors who had turned to cannibalism. Until Glasnost, the Nazino Affair remained buried. Since then, historians have revealed what happened on that remote Siberian Island. . . .

As a result, the original target of 2,000,000 deportees over ten years was halved. However, worries about costs did not stop the deportations beginning immediately- even before Stalin had given his official approval. . . .

. . . by the time the barges reached Nazino on May 18th, twenty-seven people were already dead. . . .

On board the barges, the deportees had been issued with 200grams of bread a day. Now, they had nothing but 20 tonnes of flour- around 4 tons per person. For the first four days, even this was denied them. In these conditions, it is hardly surprising that in the initial twenty-four hours, a further 295 people died. . . .

When the guards finally attempted to distribute the flour, there were riots as the hungry settlers began to fight for rations. Unable to restore order, the guards fired shots and moved the flour to the shore opposite the island while the settlers calmed down. The guards tried to distribute the supplies again the next day. However, once more fights broke out. Finally, it was decided to split the settlers into brigades of 150 people, each represented by a leader or Brigadier. These brigadiers were responsible for collecting the flour and distributing it. Unfortunately, many of these leaders were self-nominated criminals appropriated all the flour for themselves. This inauspicious beginning was only the prelude for the horrors to come. . . .

Apart from the imprisonment of several of the surviving guards, the authorities swept the whole matter under the carpet. However, with the advent of Glasnost in 1988, the details of the tragedy became publicly available for the first time. However, the Ostyak people around Nazino never forgot the terrible events of summer 1933. To them, Nazino was and always will be Death Island.

https://historycollection.co/the-nazino-affair-the-tragedy-of-cannibal-island/

Ukraine activist Kateryna Handzyuk dies after acid attack

Kateryna Handzyuk, 33, suffered burns over 40% of her body and severe eye damage as a result of the assault on 31 July in the southern city of Kherson.

Ms Handzyuk, who was also a Kherson city council member, had undergone 11 operations in the capital Kiev.

President Petro Poroshenko on Sunday called for the killers to be punished. Five suspects are already in custody.

The exact cause of Ms Handzyuk’s death was not immediately known, but reports in local media suggested it was a blood clot.

In September, the activist – who also campaigned against Russian-backed separatism – posted a video in which she urged Ukrainians to fight rampant corruption.

“I know I look bad now. But at least I’m being treated,” she said. “And I definitely know that I look much better than justice in Ukraine. Because nobody is treating it.”

The death of the activist on Sunday triggered an avalanche of reactions on social media in Ukraine, with many users expressing shock.

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-46091074

I want to fund anti-corruption movements.