6 Comments

  1. Alex

    Ha-ha!

    I still have some of those from that crazy years.

    And before these weird notes, I don’t remember exact year – I believe it was the last year of USSR – people were rationed with another type of coupons besides their salary. Those coupons was valid only for one month, the next month they were printed in different color. And at that time, prices was denominated in two currencies and people had to pay both the rouble price and coupon prices. It was done so that people could not buy too much (usually they had enough roubles but not enough coupons to make a purchase) as there was mad shortages of almost everything.

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  2. Paul Vahur

    We had also some crazy stuff with coupons in Estonia. But I have another evidence of the Soviet Union ruble high inflation – I have a 10 ruble bill and 10 ruble coin both from 1991.

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  3. Roman

    I’m embarrassed to admit that I paid 100 uah ($12) for the million kupon note after a long search through the bazaar. That’s probably the most it’s ever been worth.

    Reply
    1. Alex

      Roman, one would be able to buy at least $6 for a million of coupons in 1996 when they wnet out of circulation. The number can be slightly bigger.

      And you want, I can give you some more coupons.

      Reply
  4. Taras

    Welcome to the Millionaires Club!

    In 1995, 1,000,000 karbovantsiv equaled $6.6 (roughly a week’s pay at the time).

    That would be well over $50 in today’s local purchasing power terms.

    Reply

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