Category Archives: History

During Holodomor

One of my wife’s grandmothers was left with her brother an orphan edge, because their my mother, my wife’s great-grandmother, thought they had better chances of getting food there and surviving. She was right. Both she and her children survived. After the hunger passed, she was able to collect them and bring them home.

This was in Poltava Oblast.

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There was an expression during Holodomor which happens to rhyme in both Ukrainian and English.

Something like this: “вовна бавовна, Хот шлунок повні”

cotton. wool. At least stomach is full.

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On the other side of my wife’s family, they survived Holodomor in part because of a golden cross which someone had won as a Tsarist military decoration. They family would break off pieces of the cross and take it into town to sell to merchants in exchange for bread.

East European Genealogical Society

https://eegsociety.org/Home.aspx

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Using Cadastral Maps of Galicia

If you’re researching Christian ancestors from the Galicia region of the former Austro-Hungarian Empire, chances are good that you’ve come across church records which mention a house number where your ancestor lived at the time he married, died, or had a new baby baptized. Moreover, if you’re interested in genealogy, chances are good that you’ve used Google Maps to obtain a street view of a home located at a particular address where your ancestors lived. So it’s inevitable that those researching Galician ancestors would want to use the house number from an old church record to find that ancestor’s home on a modern map, or at least see what exists in that place now. Unfortunately, this process is not quite as straightforward as it seems. In this post, I’ll provide a little background information about Galician cadastral maps, which can be used to assist in this process, and then walk through the steps needed to locate a Galician ancestor’s house on a cadastral map so you can then determine the corresponding location on a modern map.

https://fromshepherdsandshoemakers.com/2018/09/26/using-cadastral-maps-of-galicia/

NY Times Praises Mass Murdering Mao as “One of History’s Great Revolutionary Figures”

The New York Times was forced to delete a tweet that praised Communist dictator Mao Zedong – who was responsible for the deaths of around 45 million people – as a “great revolutionary leader.”

Under Mao’s Great Leap Forward policy, over the course of just 4 years between 1958-1962 some 45 million people starved to death, making it the biggest episode of mass murder ever recorded.

Countless other victims also lost their lives as a result of Mao’s ruthless oppression, incarceration and execution of political adversaries who stood in his way.

That historical context was noticeably absent when the NY Times effusively tweeted about how Mao, “died one of history’s great revolutionary figures.”

The newspaper was forced to walk it back after a huge online backlash.

https://summit.news/2019/09/10/ny-times-praises-mass-murdering-mao-as-one-of-historys-great-revolutionary-figures/

Lys Mykyta Journals

Lys Mykyta (Ukrainian: Лис Микита) was a Ukrainian-language satirical and humorous magazine. The magazine took its name from Ivan Franko’s story about a wily fox. It was published between 1947 and 1990 by Edward Kozak and featured cartoons and caricatures. The poet Bohdan Nyzankiwsky was a regular contributor under his pen name Babay. Lys Mykyta was originally published in Munich where Kozak taught, but when he emigrated to the United States with Liuboslav Hutsaliuk (another regular contributor and friend of Kozak), it moved location.

My mother’s collection of Lys Mykyta Journals was recently donated to the Museum of the Ukrainian Diaspora in Kyiv.

But before sending them, I had them all scanned and threw up this website:

https://lysmykyta.com/

Lys Mykyta Journals

I just finished facilitating a donation to the Ukrainian Diaspora Museum (http://www.kyivhistorymuseum.org/en/museum-affiliates/museum-of-the-diaspora) in Kyiv.

My mother donated a collection of about 120 Lys Mykyta journals which were popular in the diaspora in the US and Canada, and consisted of political and societal commentary, always including cartoons and caricatures by the very talented E. Kozak.

Before sending them, I had them all scanned, and will be posting them soon.