Judicial statistics – Corruption battle seems insignificant and symbolic only

So, now for some H1 2017 statistics from the current head of the Supreme Court, Yaroslav Romanyuk “In the first half of the year, 2237 indictments on criminal proceedings on corruption crimes were received by the courts, of which only 741 were considered.”

The remainder, presumably, in a backlog together with other cases from previous years that remain, as yet, unheard. That said, the wheels of justice inevitably turn slowly even in far more efficient systems replete with far more judges and functionaries of far higher moral codes and group integrity.

Just how large the carryover into 2018 will be by the end of 2017 remains to be seen. Dozens of minnows and plankton are arrested for corruption on a daily basis as a quick glance across the regional media ably displays.

However, having been offered some numbers by the Supreme Court, it is perhaps necessary to look to the outcomes, statistically (if not at the standard of due process) of the 741 cases that reached the court in H1 of 2017.

Before breaking down the 741 cases, a reader should note that the numbers that follow don’t add up – but they are nevertheless the figures cited by the Supreme Court – thus any inaccuracies are at least accurately stated.

There were 77 acquittals.

110 companies were closed as a result of judicial verdicts.

469 officials were found guilty of corruption. Of those 469 officials, 121 went to jail. 33 suffered some form of non-custodial punishment other than purely fines, and 265 were indeed fined.

To get behind the 469 number of officials found guilty of corruption, 101 were middle and lower grade civil servants and/or institutional functionaries. 58 were Ministry of Interior employees, (including police officers), 44 military officials or various ranks, 32 local government officials, 29 law enforcement officials (not police nor prosecutors), 19 city, town and village heads, 18 deputies of local government/local councils, and 13 employees of the State Fiscal Service.

Only 2 prosecutors, a single employee of the court administration (but not a judge) and a single member of the security services also feature within that 469 number.

http://www.odessatalk.com/2017/08/judicial-statistics-corruption-ukraine/

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